Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT)

Historical Milestones

Angelica Wackenfors, MSc, and others, publish a study examining the effects of negative pressure therapy on peristernal soft tissue blood flow and metabolism in an uninfected porcine sternotomy wound model. Laser Doppler velocimetry was used to measure microvascular blood flow in muscular and subcutaneous tissue. Wound fluid pH, partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, and lactate were analyzed after 0, 30, and 60 minutes of continuous negative pressure (-50 to -200 mm Hg).

The peak increase in blood flow occurred closer to the wound edge in muscular versus subcutaneous tissue (2.5 cm and 3.5 cm at -125mmHg). In immediate proximity to the wound, a zone of relative hypoperfusion increased with increasing negative pressure and was "especially prominent in subcutaneous tissue (reaching 1.0 cm at -50 mmHg and 2.6 cm at -200mmHg." The authors commented that, "A negative pressure of 75 or 100 mm Hg may be profitable because it effectively stimulates peristernal soft tissue blood flow without producing a large zone of relative hypoperfusion."

Wound fluid partial pressure of oxygen and lactate levels (in combination considered important to healing) increased when NPWT was applied.

 

 

 

 

 

 

NPWT
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Historical Milestones
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The Prospera PRO Series
 
Wound Healing 101
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Phases of Wound Healing
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Wound Treatment
Optimizing the Host
Wound Closure
Ecomonic Considerations

 

 

 

 

 
           
 
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